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would be good? >> we have an enormous deficit problem in the united states. nobody's dealt with it since bill clinton was president of the united states. there are a number of things we're going to have to do in order to meet our deficit. we're going to have to both raise taxes and cut spending. one of the areas we must cut spending is defense. there hasn't been serious cuts in defense in 30 years. the defense industry is well positioned. they have plants in something in over 300 districts. there's a lot of bipartisan defense spending. for example, the defense authorization bill that just passed yesterday in the senate gave the pentagon $17 billion more than they asked for. so to think that any industry or any taxpayer or any group of people who depend on government spending can be exempted from the serious problem that we have that's caused by this deficit is a mistake. everybody is going to have to pay for this. >> dawn, right or wrong, the defense industry has this reputation of being bloated, overcharging. are we at a point where we could afford to make cuts in defense spending to tr
progress. britain started with a large deficit, but we're getting it down. >> you've drawn criticism about the lack of supporting growth. when will we see measures that booth the long term growth of the economy. >> i think you see two sorts of measures. big structural reforms to education and welfare, but also yesterday changes to our tax regime. so we now have one of the lowest corporation tax rates of any major economy in the world. we've just cut it so that it will be 21%, much lower than our competitors. and we've also greatly increased the allowances for small and medium sized firms so they can invest and expand. so where we've been able to help businesses, we've absolutely done that, and we've had very positive reaction from the business community. >> how concerned are you about the aaa rating and the risk that we continue to drift, still need to cut more and boost growth? >> well, we've got to go on commanding the confidence of the world that we can deal with our debts. that is reflected in the very, very low interest rates that we get at the moment for gilts. and of course that's t
. moving to a more accurate inflation measure called the "chained c.p.i." would cut the deficit by $200 billion over ten years. supporters say the change wouldn't cut benefits. >> if we're making the change to reflect what is the real cost of living, as opposed to a different one, then you are not reducing them; you're just truing up what you should be getting. not something that-- i hate to use the term-- that might be inflated beyond what it should have been. >> reporter: this so-called technical fix will shave a quarter of a percentage point off social security's annual cost of living increase, and that difference adds up over time. some worry that will hurt the very old. >> it cuts real benefits. if somebody is getting fewer dollars in their check, that's real to them. and for people who are sliding progressively farther behind prevailing living standards, which is true of those out of the labor force for a very long time, it's about as real as it gets. >> reporter: but the change to a chained c.p.i. is easy to do, and that means it could be packaged into a deficit agreement quickly
trillion and due to expire in february without more deficit reduction. >> history shows that the only major deficit cutting deals we ever do around here ever comes after debates over the debt ceiling. it may be a good idea if you don't care about the debt, but it's a nonstarter for those of us who do. >> reporter: public opinion generally is on the president's side. house republicans are not paralyzed or powerless. in fact, they're more unifyied behind speaker boehner than they were on the debt crisis a year ago. why does this matter? the white house is noticing if there is a deal boehner can find the votes to pass it. >> thanks. we want to give you an idea of what's really at stake here. rebecca jarvis has a lock at how the government spends money and how it could spend less. rebecca, good morning. >> good morning. >> it comes up in terms of the money we're talking about in raising rates. how much is it that the republicans are objecting to? >> if you lock at that $250,000 number, if you were to raise taxes on everybody making $250,000 or more in this countr
they will not increase the debt ceiling now $16 trillion and due to expire in february without more deficit reduction. >> history shows the only major deficit cutting deals we ever do around here, ever, comes after debates over the debt ceiling. it may be a good idea if you don't care about the debt, but it's a non-starter for those of us who do. >> reporter: public opinion generally is on the president's side, but republicans in the house are not paralyzed or perilous, more unified behind speaker boehner than a year ago. why is this important? the white house is beginning to notice and now believe there is a deal boehner can find the stroets pass it. >> an idea what's really at stake. rebecca jarvis has a look how the government spends money and how it could spend less. rebec rebecca, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. >> the question comes up in terms of the money that we're talking about in raising the rate. how much is it that the republicans are objecting to? >> if you look at that $250,000 number, if you were to raise taxes on everybody making $250,000 or more in the country that would ra
that if we go over the cliff the deficit goes up. >> and the debt goes up. >> and the debt goes up. >> wrong. >> like our relationship people don't get it. >> deficit almost goes away. difference is about $8 trillion. >> about 10.5. >> join us tomorrow. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." >>> good wednesday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." live at the nyse. what a morning shaping up here. a little data to look at. m&a. the president speaks to the business roundtable in a couple of hours. futures with modest gains. europe holding onto gains and china up nearly 3% over night as shanghai catches a break. our road map begins with a $20 billion deal. freeport mcmoran getting into the energy business making two acquisitions. plains exploration and mcmoran exploration. >>> concerns over the u.s. economy as adp misses estimates. the blame goes to superstorm sandy. goldman says the party is officially over for gold. >> starbucks at an investors conference will add 1,500 stores in the u.s. over the next five years. wait until you hear what they said about china. >> a big day in
revenue. as i've indicated, the only way to get the kind of revenue for a balanced deficit reduction plan is to make sure that we're also modestly increasing rates for people who can afford it. folks like me. just to be clear, i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevents the top rate from going up for folks at the top 2%. >> the concerted effort from the white house is very clear. here's white house press secretary jay carney. >> what will produce a deal is an acknowledgement by republicans, republican leaders, that rates on the top 2%, the wealthiest americans, have to rise. there is no deal without that acknowledgement, and without a concrete, mathematically sound proposal -- >> but speaker boehner still insists he can get the revenue without raising rates? >> now, the revenues we're putting on the table are going to come from guess who? the rich. there are ways to limit deductions, close loopholes, and have the same people pay more of their money to the federal government without raising tax rates, which we believe will harm our economy. >> some conservatives just can't stan
put together a plan to move us towards some kind of deficit reduction package eventually evolved into the simpson-bowles commission plan. but the point i was making and i think the speaker is making is republicans have not come out here with some hardball, crazy off-the-table negotiation. what they have done is put something that bill clinton's former chief of staff at one time odd voe indicated for. and i think in the end that reflects that we are moving toward the potential compromise deal. >> he said -- >> i think i'm inappropriately in the middle here. i ought to be over there on the left. what bowles said yesterday was i was testifying before congress, and i described that as a midpoint between what republicans want and what democrats wanted. it was not what i would recommend. but i don't think that's even relevant. >> -- circumstances have changed since then. >> i don't even think that's relevant. i think the real question here and i think ron's right about this is are tax rates going to go up? yes, they're going to go up, because republicans are not going to have to vote f
. >> do you briyou believe if you rote deficit -- two different ways. you either keep the government that you have and pay for it by raising taxes, or you kind of leave taxes where they are and you shrink government down to where it pays for it. does it matter for the future and for growth which way you do it in your view? >> it does. if you put it all into like a tightening, so how much tightening occurs in the economy that would slow the economy, it's far better to actually reduce government spending than it is to actually raise taxes. >> although that hurts the economy, too. >> everything hurts the economy. so it's a question of which is most -- or least harmful and that tends to be cutting government spending. >> but i do think it's -- >> although tim geithner would disagree with me. >> one side wants to keep the government and entitlements like we have it. and the other side wants to take away all the excess government -- >> i think both sides agree that you need to do both. just a question of how much. >> we need to do both to do a deal. i don't think both sides dwre that it's
where you get a down payment in 2013 which brings the deficit to gdp ratio down from 7% down to 6%. if we could do that along with some long-term agreement we'll get another trillion out of entitlements or a trillion from taxes or somewhere else but a range of what we'll do in 2013 where we'll get the money for the rest of the sort of fiscal issues over the next few years but some down payment. we get the down payment and it's a reasonable downappointment not one that will crush the economy, i think the market could react very well to that. >> what's your opinion on what's going on in the economy ex-sandy? you were saying a better jobs number would show the economy is resilient. do you think it is resilient, if it doing, if you can take out the effects of the hurricane, better than people think? >> i think it's got so much potential. i see all the hesitancy here. but pent-up demand is forcing the housing market higher. pent-up demand is forcing the vehicle market higher. consumer finances are very much improved. people have locked in the 30-year, fixed-rate mortgages at a wonderfu
and negotiations are about deficit reduction. president obama thinks they're about fairness. most americans, solid majority, want to see taxes raised on those upper income americans, even though only 19% think it will have much of an impact on deficits. it's not about the fiscal crisis. it's about fairness in the minds of most americans. president obama understands that and republicans don't. >> is that because in your polling day, i always thought that people favored spending reduction and favored smaller government. this may be a mistake that the gop has not emphasized spending cuts. >> they certainly do. most people -- two out of three people want to see a deal that includes both tax hikes and spending cuts. they want to see more spending cuts, but they don't expect spending cuts to come out of this no matter what happens. in fact, the one thing that most people in the middle class believe is that regardless of whether we go over the fiscal cliff or whether a deal is reached to avert that, middle class taxes are going up, and so is spending. so there's a lot of cynicism in this process. >> real
- percent of voters were willing to share their thoughts about the "simpson- bowles" deficit policy up for debate in >> you don't have to look >> >> nobody wants to get this done more than me. >> >> but key players aren't talking in the same room. congressional aides say they're not even >> the president is ready, willing and able, waiting to be able to sit down and seriously negotiate this but they have to be willing to come to the table with specifics. i think the next 72 hours >> some lawmakers are going back to their districts. congress has little scheduled business for the rest of the week. house negotiations. >> i'll be available at any moment to sit down with the president to get serious >> a sticking point remains whether to raise tax rates for the wealthiest two percent of americans. speaker boehner concedes the rich will pay more in taxes, but says that won't solve a spending problem. his democratic counterpart says >> passing middle income tax holding them hostage from tax cuts for the rich. >> president obama also tried to pin a negotiating tactic on republicans, saying c
know, one thing is we take a huge bite out of the deficit. we do it in a crude may, and there would be immediate attempts to fix it and fine-tune it and take some back. some would probably get through. if you actually want to look at it from a policy standpoint, it may not be the worst possible option to just go over the cliff and then put back in the tax cuts and the spending increases or renewals that you'd like to put back in. so, you know, worst things could happen. >> well, listen, alan simpson and i go back to his sound from the "today" show, eugene. he said anyone talking about it in that way, there's stupidity involved. he didn't say, eugene, you better not because you're my buddy, but the reality is even our first read team says this notion or all of this media hype about going off the cliff from some of our colleagues is overstated. to their point a deal is in sight, that's why boehner and the president spoke yesterday. it's a matter of how big. will they separate the tax cuts from a larger needed plan later down the road? i guess what you folks in d.c. like to call "kicki
for a couple of years about tax rates, about entitlement spending, about deficits that have topped $1 trillion throughout the obama presidency. i suspect all of them eventually are going to get settled but they aren't going to get settled at the same time, including the debt limit increase. >> john harwood, thank you. >>> let's see where we do stand on the fiscal cliff deal. let's look at our "rise above" meter. time to stop talking and start actle. we were at a half-way point, now back to a quarter on the "rise above" meter, closing to no deal than deal. >>> lawmakers trying to solve the fiscal cliff issue. police trying to solve a burglary at the home of california congressman darrel issa. according to reports, more than 50 pieces of jewelry worth about $100,000 were stolen from the congressman's home on november 29th. watches, earrings, rings, bracelets involved and what issa spokesperson calls irreplaceable family air looms. >>> to the jobs report today. super storm sandy slammed the east coast but it looks like it didn't have all that much impact on the labor market. november jobs numbers
that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington's got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. >> tom: congress and the president have 24 days to reach a deal, before the fiscal cliff's tax hikes and spending cuts take effect. >> susie: mark zandi says "bad things will happen to the economy pretty fast" if lawmakers don't settle the fiscal cliff issue. he's chief economist of moody's analytics. so mark falling off the fiscal cliff means bad things. how bad? >> it could be quite bad, susie. i don't think it's if we get into january and we haven't settled this but if house mars haven't nailed thi down by early february, i think stock investors, bond investors will start to get very very nervous, start selling, risky businesses pull back and by the end of february when we start approaching the ceiling for the debt limit, i think we'll be back in recession. it will be a fairly severe recession. so policy makers have a few weeks but not much more than that. they have to get this together. >> susie: some people are
for a deficit deal, president obama pressed his case at the home of a middle class family in virginia today, part of his pitch to extend tax cuts for all but the very wealthy. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour"
the business community views this deficit thing as the biggest problem that we can solve that we need to solve. there's something called a campaign to fix the debt, which i'm on the steering committee, 120 leading ceos from everything from general electric to jpmorgan on down. really committed to doing something and accepting the idea that revenues have to go up, not ideological about how, but most of all, wanting a big $4 trillion package. and so they have become, in effect, allies of the president. they're really trying to get to the same place. at some point there may be differences over how much entitlements, how much this or that, but right now their interests are aligned, and they both agreed to be friends again. and so they've spent a stream of business ceos into the white house. the president -- yesterday the business roundtable and gave a very warm and accommodating speech. and they are comrades in arms, the least for the time being. >> willie, what a big difference from what we heard from business leaders for the first four years. this is a pretty dramatic shift. >> or even just a fe
-simpson deficit-cutting plan, erskine bowles and alan simpson. >>> here's a million-dollar question. should passengers be allowed to use electronic devices during takeoff and landing? this morning the fcc says yes. it's written a letter urging the faa to allow tablets, e-readers and other portable devices to be used in flight. the chairman of the fcc says personal electronics allow business travelers to do their work while others can stay informed and connected with family and friends. the faa is reviewing whether the devices interfere with the planes' control system. >>> justin bieber is flying high these days in the middle of a sold-out tour. his new album has three hit singles, but he did not get a single nomination this week from grammy voters. a mix of writers, journalists and others in the music industry. ben tracy has reaction to this high-profile snub. ♪ i'd like to you everything you want ♪ >> reporter: apparently grammy voters are not willing to commit to justin bieber. ♪ if i was your boyfriend ♪ i'd never let you go >> reporter: when the nominations were announced wednes
the campaign, congratulations, you had a great victory, and let's get serious about dealing with this deficit and debt here at the end of the year. >> back to the president's comments. he had yet before to explicitly say rates had to go up on those earning $250,000 or more. that was the white house position. that is their condition now for a deal. it's in the face of what republicans want saying no rate increases; however, a little wiggle room, and the president didn't rule out a smaller rate increase than he's calling for could be a part of a final product if they get to that stage. lizly thank you very much, rich edson. david: we have a governor who says his state takes the right action to prevent falling off its own fiscal cliff and the president can learn a lot. liz: joining us now is the iowa governor, and, governor, let us just explain that to the viewers. you deal with a democratic legislature, and you managed to get things done. you could show by example. how have you done it? what do you think inside the beltway crowd is doing wrong here? >> well, they need to get past the politics,
taxes. now let's former cbo director says these cuts fail to control the greatest deficit challenge, federal health care spending. >> the future path of mandatory has been clear for a decade now. it is largely driven by health care costs and baby boom and every cbo director come to the same conclusion. you can't grow your way out of it. you can not tax your way out of it. you must change these programs. >> democrats argue if the government cuts too much spending the economy will slow further. back to you. david: rich edson, thank you very much, rich. lauren: with all the uncertainty surrounding fiscal cliff should you invest differently right now? david: one economist says investors have to look beyond the fiscal crisis. we have senior economist at oppenheimer fund joins us now. more than that, what you say you've got the perfect split. -p60/40, 60 being equities and 40 being dot, dot, dot, something else. how do you devise, some people are gold bugs say it is all gold. cash bugs, say you have to be flexible, keep it in cash. how do you divide the 40% not in equities? >> first of al
deficit just by raising money from rich people. >> let's talk netflix. receiving wells notice from s.e.c., regulators warning they may bring civil action against the company and the ceo for violating public disclosure rules with a facebook post. back on july 3rd, the ceo posting netflix a monthly viewing exceeded 1 billion hours for the first time ever in june. the s.e.c. requires public companies to make the information public. hastings says he didn't believe the facebook post was material information although that day the stock was up 13%. in a letter yesterday, he also suggested the fact the post was assessable to more than 245,000 subscribers to the page makes it very public. you can choose to disclose information through other venues considered fair that may reach fewer people at the end of the day. >> ain't up to you. it's up to the government. >> rules are rules. >> and these things do need to evolve. there is little doubt about that. i remember when fd was put in. i would have conversations with executives and say you can tell me -- i'm on cnbc -- i will make it public. i'm n
a credible plan in reducing the deficit but avoiding actually falling off a cliff at the end of the year. it's very possible that they don't reach an agreement between now and january 1st. however, when january 15th hits and most americans receive their first paycheck and they notice it's actually lower, i think hell is going to break loose. as a result of that, they'll come back to the table and reach an agreement. >> i think don't panic is good advice, but i don't see what the problem is with taking a little cash off the table here and putting it on the side and waiting to see if we do get a major adverse market reaction to them putting that cash to work once we get a resolution. >> this is what makes a market. thank you for your divergent thoughts on the market today. see you later. thanks. >>> when we come back, we have the closing countdown already for this tuesday. >> then, we're watching netflix. the stock surging today on a deal with disney. is the stock move justified? we'll check it out. more on that straight ahead. stay with us. people save a lot . but today...( sfx: loud noise of
and deficits of the u.s., what are the implications for our kids? what are the implications for the economy? give it to us straight. >> there's no question that the most important challenge for us to tackle here is controlling health care costs. medicare is at the center of it when it comes to the budget. we're going to have to do as much as possible to get on top of the fact that health care costs squeezing out the rest of the budget. that's true through the whole system, and we're going to have to fix the way that entitlement program works. in terms of what this means for the country, the whole issue here is are we going to leave the economy strong enough for the next generation? that's what this comes down to. what we're going now, we're making these short-term choices. we've been make them for years. we're spending more than we're willing to pay for, and we're basically saying to the next generation, here's the bill. and it's going to just undermine the strength of the economy. i should point out, we're not borrowing that to invest. we're borrowing that to consume. so as important as it
're going to take a look at the real issues impacting our debt and deficit coming up next. >>> and as bad as john boehner made it sound, how come the markets seem to be trading like we are going to have a deal? what does wall street know that we don't? tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 when i'm trading, i'm totally focused. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and the streetsmart edge trading platform from charles schwab... tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 gives me tools that help me find opportunities more easily. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i can even access it from the cloud and trade on any computer. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and with schwab mobile, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i can focus on trading anyplace, anytime. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 until i choose to focus on something else. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 all this with no trade minimums. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and only $8.95 a trade. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 open an account with a $50,000 deposit, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and get 6 months commission-free trades. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-866-294-5412. >>> there's that word, absolute. is it an absolute fiasco? time for our daily visit
and what's happening in britain and spain and elsewhere, they have embarked upon deficit reduction. and what that has done is contract their economies when they still have very high unemployment, very high under utilization of a lot of resources that. means that their ratio of their debts to their total economies keeps on getting worse. if you want that kind of economy, that kind of austerity economics, well then what you want to do is raise taxes on the middle class and also cut government spending. if you don't you don't go that way. and casey, with all due respect, there are three people looking for jobs for every job opening these days. i don't see how you can say that they're being paid for not getting jobs. >> casey, why don't we put some incentives into this economy? why don't we make it pay to work after taxes? why don't we make it pay more to invest after tax? while we're doing that, casey, why don't we shrink the size and scope of government so that the private sector can keep its own resources and spend up more wisely than the government will? >> well, you're asking me t
. >> bottom line. entitlement spending is 60% of the federal budget. no way to have a credible deficit reduction plan without doing some major changes to social security, medicare, and medicaid. and huh they work all that out and crunch the numbers remains to be seen. republicans have given way on some of the tax issues waiting for the democrats to give way on entitlement issues not satisfied with numbers from the white house just yet. so, this nasty tango continues. >> we have to live within our means, nice if the government could figure out how to do so as well. >>> new campaign finance filings show the 2012 presidential election was the most expensive in history. tally put the cost at $2 billion which includes $86 million raised by mitt romney. a computer glitch delayed, president obama's final number, "the washington post" reports. the spokesman says that the president raised $1.1 billion. >> think what else the money could have gone toward in the tight times. >>> despite loud objections, republicans in michigan managed to push right to work measures through the legislature. hundre
we asked last time about when they had a debt -- big deficit debate. we find first, 17% back in november thought congress and the administration could come to a deal. now 44% say it is unlikely. current results -- 48%. put those two blue columns together. 48% to 44% is that a solution is likely. let's come over on this side and look at who believes that it is likely. when you break it down by party you get some interesting results. right here republicans, 52% say it is unlikely to 42%, i independents, 47%-43%. democrats are driving this number. when we look at the 48% on this side think it's likely, that's driven very much on the other side by the 60% of democrats. now what do people want? when we go to the wall for that, some interesting results here. what this is, this is net percent acceptable. if 50% think the idea's acceptable, 30% think it is unacceptable. that gives you a net 20%. what we find here is that raising taxes for those who make incomes of greater than $250,000, that's the most acceptable. why? the blue, net acceptable for democrats, pluts green acceptable fo
by more if you are going to deal with the deficit. >> that's what you are saying or taxes on the middle class have to go up at some point. i am not sure. you say you counted whether republicans would vote for it. i am not sure that's accept am in the democratic caucus. >> if it's acceptable to obama, it will pass the senate. no one has to worry about that. if it's acceptable -- if john boehner and barack obama cut a deal, it will pass the senate and the house no matter what nancy pelosi wants. >> i disagree with that. >> we have agreed so far on almost everything so. >> not here to necessarily agree. >> not 95, '96, gingrich who could dictate. if john boehner did which was walk into the caucus and say accept this or i am leaving, they will say bye. same thing with obama. the democratic caucus thinks they have the leverage >> bill: 20 minutes. here stan collender lendcollender. i am going to ask you about apple announcing that they are going to have a whole new line of computer manufacturing in the united states and what that means leading up to the job
republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the cliff. that's what they think. they think that you favor -- >> just for the record since we're on tv. that's silly if they think that they shouldn't be ceos. >> it doesn't really matter. that's what they think. >> i want you to walk me up to that moment. >> behind the record. i like that too. >> i'm stuck. like grover is stuck with this pledge he made everybody take which is that they have to go over the cliff because they obviously will not ever say the word tax. they will only say revenue. i'm stuck speaking to many more ceos than grover norquist is. he thinks it's silly. he thinks ceos are silly. i
that actually reduces our deficit. i'm willing to work with anyone to put a plan on the table, but we're not willing to negotiate with someone who hasn't put a plan on the table. the president has not put a serious plan on the table. >> as far as a compromise on the marginal tax rate 35% going up let's say 36% or 37%, is that acceptable? >> no. no. because marginal tax rate increases if there is any increase in revenue, just gives them more to play with on capitol hill and more to spend. when we talk about fairness, when the top 2%, the $250,000 and above are already paying 45% of total income tax, that's a big question of fairness there too. >> who should nicki haley name to replace you? >> i talk today her today. i share the same philosophy, the conservative philosophy. i told her i trust her decision and i'm not going to push her one way or another. >> a lot of speculation, congressman scott? >> he's a wonderful person. our whole delegation is really strong. she's got a tough choice, but i'm convinced she'll give me someone as good or better than i am i can pass the torch to. and i
the wrong budget knows, if you have a deficit that means you have to bring in more rate comment and spend less. melissa: all we're ever talking about is raising taxes and nobody is talking about what we need to cut. the first thing you would do is stop spending. let's tighten our belts. regardless though you really think it is too late? i think they can come up with some solution that is held together with chicken wire and bubblegum and scotch tape and this little crummy thing that will keep us from going over the cliff pushing the whole problem off into the future. speak i think you have to treat two separate issues separately. one is avoiding the cliff, and i think the way to do that is to reach a short-term agreement on tax cut extensions. relatively optimistic they can get a long-term budget agreement done next year, but don't think they can do it in two weeks which is what the president thinks it's going to happen. if they separate the two issues and reach an agreement, that will onny be temporary. it is not like they're signing away their future in blood and worry about long-term ta
and deficit proposal over the last couple years. half trillion in tax increases or trillion and a half in tax increases, $600 billion in spending cuts, more spending, and a permanent increase in the debt ceiling. on fox news sunday, boehner called that deal a joke. >> just flabbergasted. i looked, and said, you can't be serious? i just never seen anything like it. we got seven weeks between election day and the end of the year. three of those weeks have been wasted with the nonsense. >> okay. you heard them, the first time in two decades now, acknowledge they want revenues up as the balanced plan, a good first steppedded, but they have to say what they do operates and revenues. that's hard for republicans. >> runs of billions of spending cuts, tax increases begin in less than a month, and with the negotiations, two sides are about where they started. still, aids say it's early to be moving to an agreement with plenty of time for each side to extract the best deal possible before selling it to the parties and selling position to voters. with that, president obama is hosting a twitter question-
, and there is a difference of opinion. nobody wants to see taxes go up. that's a fact. we all want to reduce the deficit, and if you look at where the tax rates were in the clinton administration with the highest and most sustained economic growth in the history of the country, that's where they went to and maybe there's a compromise there where they wouldn't even go that high, but to say they're not going to expire at all, we'll do what we have been doing, that's an unsustainable position. dennis: all right, you know what? i appreciate it, we have to wrap it up. i appreciate you both came on here together today. thank you very much for being here, and keep working at it. we need your help. >> have a good one. >> thanks. cheryl: more on breaking news from egypt. look at the pictures coming out of cairo. at this point, an estimated 50,000 protesters are in tahrir square chaptering down with morsi and the constitution. he rammed through a referendum, a draft constitution, supposed to be september 15th; we'll see, and groups, parties, just many members of the public in egypt taking part now. we learned mom
should be because part of the deficit problem, a great part, is entitlements, social security and medicare, keep adding fiscal burdens as people's live expectancy increases and it's great that people are living longer but when social security was first thought of the life expectancy was only 67. now it is around 85. we need to raise retirement ages or somehow thinking about cutting back on benefits to keep the programs in balance. ashley: diana, the other side of this issue is coming down to taxes. two years ago the president said he didn't want to let taxes go up because gdp growth was so low. how can you make that argument two years later today. gdp still struggling to get any traction? >> he should be making that argument because gdp growth is now at 2%. it was at 2.5 when he made the argument in 2010. there was even more reason not to get tax rates higher, not to allow them to go higher. the only way we'll get out of this fiscal mess is through more economic growth. and if we raise tax rates that is going to stifle economic growth. we need to be keeping tax rates the same
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